cupidity


cupidity
cupidity, greed, rapacity, avarice are comparable when meaning intense desire for wealth or possessions.
Cupidity stresses the intensity and compelling nature of the desire and often suggests covetousness as well
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the sight of so much wealth aroused his cupidity

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the vast cupidity of business in preempting the virgin resources of California— Partington

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Greed, more than cupidity, implies a controlling passion; it suggests not strong but inordinate desire, and it commonly connotes meanness as well as covetousness
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a low, incessant, gnawing greed ... for power, for money, for destruction— White

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Rapacity implies both cupidity and actual seizing or snatching not only of what one especially desires but of anything that will satisfy one's greed for money or property; it often suggests extortion, plunder, or oppressive exactions
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the rapacity of the conquerors knew no bounds

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the woman's greed and rapacity . . . disgusted meThackeray

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the rapacity of the warlords— Peffer

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Avarice, although it involves the idea of cupidity and often carries a strong suggestion of rapacity, stresses that of miserliness and implies both an unwillingness to let go whatever wealth or property one has acquired and an insatiable greed for more
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such a stanchless avarice that, were I king, I should cut off the nobles for their lands, desire his jewels and this other's house: and my more-having would be as a sauce to make me hunger more— Shak.

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they scrimped and stinted and starved themselves . . . out of avarice and the will-to-power— M u mford

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Analogous words: covetousness, avariciousness, greediness, acquisitiveness (see corresponding adjectives at COVETOUS): avidity, eagerness (see corresponding adjectives at EAGER): lust, *desire

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cupidity — Cu*pid i*ty (k? p?d ? t?), n. [F. cupidite, L. cupiditas, fr. cupidus longing, desiring, fr. cupere to long for, desire. See {Covet}.] 1. A passionate desire; love. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Eager or inordinate desire, especially for wealth; greed …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cupidity — (n.) mid 15c., from Anglo Fr. cupidite, from M.Fr. cupidité, from L. cupiditatem (nom. cupiditas) passionate desire, lust; ambition, from cupidus eager, passionate, from cupere to desire (perhaps cognate with Skt. kupyati bubbles up, becomes… …   Etymology dictionary

  • cupidity — index desire, greed Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • cupidity — [n] greed, strong desire acquisitiveness, avarice, avariciousness, avidity, covetousness, craving, eagerness, graspingness, greediness, hunger, infatuation, itching*, longing, lust, passion, possessiveness, rapaciousness, rapacity, voracity,… …   New thesaurus

  • cupidity — ► NOUN ▪ greed for money or possessions. ORIGIN Latin cupiditas, from cupidus desirous …   English terms dictionary

  • cupidity — [kyo͞o pid′ə tē] n. [ME & Anglo Fr cupidite < L cupiditas < cupidus: see CUPID] strong desire, esp. for wealth; avarice; greed …   English World dictionary

  • cupidity — [[t]kjuːpɪ̱dɪti[/t]] N UNCOUNT Cupidity is a greedy desire for money and possessions. [FORMAL] His eyes gave him away, shining with cupidity. Syn: avarice …   English dictionary

  • cupidity — noun /kjuːˈpɪdəti/ Extreme greed, especially for wealth. The conquerors cupidity created economic problems in the kingdom. Syn: avarice, covetousness See Also: cupid …   Wiktionary

  • cupidity — cu|pid|i|ty [kjuˈpıdıti] n [U] formal [Date: 1400 1500; : French; Origin: cupidité, from Latin cupiditas, from cupere to desire ] very strong desire for something, especially money or property = ↑greed ▪ the cupidity of some businessmen …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • cupidity — [15] The Latin verb cupere meant ‘desire’ (related forms such as Sanskrit kup ‘become agitated’, Church Slavonic kypeti ‘boil’, and Latvian kūpēt ‘boil, steam’ suggest that its underlying notion is ‘agitation’). One of its derivatives was the… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins


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